Posted in Graphic Resources

Create Graphic Books With Keynote

If you think Keynote (Mac, iOS) is only for presentations, you are missing out on a lot of graphic goodness. Keynote offers a broad range of features that can be used in all kinds of creative ways. Forget the bullet points and test drive its graphic features to create beautiful books, cards, blog images and much more.

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Scrapbooking doesn’t have to be cutsy. In this example, the notepaper layer tells how to layer the graphics, but it could just as easily be used to tell a family story. Keynote makes it easy to layer graphic elements like the textured background, the page from an old family letter and the vegetation. When you don’t have a photo to complement your story, look for other options.

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Keynote can also be used to introduce a blog post. This one is quite simple . . . an old family photo, a map of Savannah from an old book, a graphic and some cool fonts. The graphics and the title grab the eye and make your readers want to learn the rest of the story.

Historic graphics such as the map shown above are easy to find. My first stop is always Flickr Commons. Archives, libraries and many other institutions from around the world have posted their photo/graphic collections in the Commons. Even better, most of them are public domain so we can put them to good use. It’s doubtful you will find a photograph of an ancestor, but you can find plenty of images to add atmosphere to your stories. KeynoteGraphics103

This photo takes us back to Grafton Street in Dublin, Ireland, sometime around World War I. If you are telling a story focused in a particular place, check Flickr Commons to see what you can find. Both the British Library and Internet Archive are scanning and posting graphics from old books at the Commons that can also be quite useful.

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Even today’s photographs can be aged to fit your needs. Apps like Stackables [iOS – $2.99] and Distressed FX [iOS – $.99] can turn a photograph into a piece of art – aged or otherwise.

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Keynote makes it easy to combine your text with photos, maps, graphic images and ephemera to build a graphical storybook.

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One other thing that makes Keynote so useful for storytellers is that you can create your “little stories” as your research discovers them, then rearrange them in whatever order you want. And, when you are ready to share, all you do is export the entire “presentation” as a PDF document.

Your graphic book can now be easily shared with family and friends.

Author:

St. Augustine native, Air Force veteran, Army wife and family historian.

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